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Thursday
Jan032013

"Mindfull" activities - a great answer!

What are the highest leverage activities that are best for ensuring that you have a good life?

(Found this question on Quora… Do you use Quora?…Check it out!)

This is a followup to What’s the single most valuable lesson you’ve learned in your professional life?

Focus on high-leverage activities.  Leverage is defined as the amount of output or impact produced per unit of time spent.

http://www.quora.com/Life-Advice/What-are-the-highest-leverage-activities-that-are-best-for-ensuring-that-you-have-a-good-life#ans1883606 

5: MINDFULNESS/CONVERSATION. 

I define conversation as the meaningful clashing of ideas and perspectives. You don’t need to be talking to someone else- you could explore your own mind, or the natural world, and that would be a form of conversation- anything that leads to insight and understanding. Mindfulness. 

Exercise can be a kind of conversation you have with your body- if you’re not listening, you could get injured. 

Reading is, ideally, a conversation with other human minds, past and present.

Your relationships grow the most in moments where you are paying the most attention to one another.

Passive, thoughtless routines will not do in this pursuit. Pay attention. Give a damn. Care. Listen. You can differentiate all great experiences and mediocre ones by assessing the mindfulness/thoughtfulness present in a process.

Steve Jobs was a mindful, thoughtful guy with regards to his work. Buddha was a mindful, thoughtful guy. So was Jesus. All good artists, all great anything- be mindful, pay attention, have a great conversation- with yourself, with each other, with the world. Devote yourself to learning and understanding new points of view, so that you better understand your own. 

Pay attention and be engaged for a great life.

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